sustainable

An Earth Day Call to Action

 

Audrey Hepburn once said, “To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow”.

 As a family and community here in Port Au Prince, we can press on these simple words. Words that project vision and dreams. Looking upon a simple seed and it’s potential, days and years from now. There is no limit as to where tomorrow can take us.

Giving our lives nourishment is a renewing practice. Caring for our bodies, our souls and our world can coincide beautifully in simple practices like gardening. There is something healing that comes in digging in the dirt, something deeply satisfying that comes in growing your own food, and there is something wonderful for our earth that comes when we find such natural ways to meet our needs. If we can reflect practices that embody this growth, we can spread education and investment throughout our family and into the communities of our artisans.

Photo: Harvest 107

Through generosities of partners, we have been given the opportunity to dig deeper with enrichment programs here at the workshop. We were joined by a corporate responsibility team last fall that came down and not only donated materials, time, and energy, but laid the ground work for the structure of our lunch sustainability vision being brought to life through a rooftop garden. As we set out to continue to find ways to implement simple and sustainable nourishment to our workshop, Haiti Design Co-op’s path struck a gold mine when we found Harvest 107.

Harvest 107, from nursery to garden, embodies a vision of growth through something simple- food. Taking a breath on their garden property opens a feeling of opportunity and renewal beyond what is seen in the dirt.  Renewal that brings forth possibility and growth that we hope to model here at HDC. Through this spirit, our garden will empower our family as they seek to develop practices that take them to their roots. The fruits of their labor are reflected in their mission statement,

to make safe, nutritious food available to every person on the planet.” and belief that “food is a right, not a privilege” .

Photo: Harvest 107

Photo: Harvest 107

(To learn more about Harvest 107 please explore their website)

Harvest 107 partners with organizations and community groups to build gardens that connect people to the importance of renewal and nourishment, as well as give every person the opportunity for sufficient food sources.

By building a sustainable rooftop garden alongside Harvest 107 we will be given the ability to-

  • Provide added nutrition to our employee lunches

  • Train leaders in sustainable gardening practices that can spread in surrounding communities

  • Provide educational classes on preventive healthcare through nutrition

  • Give our artisans the chance to become  a part of a project that they can watch grow (literally) and expand on individually, as a family, and into communities where their daily lives take place.  

By combining the visions of HDC and Harvest 107, the following plan was developed:

The Harvest Box : Our custom engineered garden boxes include a self-watering irrigation system that requires no electricity. Each Harvest Box is made from re-purposed shipping pallets and designed to use the least amount of materials while achieving the optimal environment for urban gardening. The boxes are not only functional, they are aesthetically pleasing and instantly transform raw spaces into a thing of beauty.”

Our goal is to launch the rooftop garden with-

  • 6 harvest boxes=70 plants

  • Training Sessions in-

    • care and maintenance

    •  organic pest control

    • composting

    • harvesting food

    • seed banking for planting the next crop.

 

The roots of our rooftop garden, tended by our leather artisan, Adelson. 

The roots of our rooftop garden, tended by our leather artisan, Adelson. 

 
 
 
 

“The key elements to a successful food sustainability project is great design and thorough education and training.”

- Pfaff Family, Harvest 107

 

 

 


Here's Where You Come In...

TO BRING THIS GARDEN TO LIFE WE ARE LOOKING FOR SPONSORS TO RALLY BEHIND US AND FUND THESE NUTRITIOUS AND EDUCATIONAL HARVEST BOXES.


Sponsor a plant- $25

For just $25, individuals can sponsor one of the 70 new and promising plants coming straight from the Harvest 107 greenhouse to our well-loved workshop roof. AND receive a free Leather Bracelet made in-house at HDC. 

Sponsor half a Harvest box- $75

For $75, individuals can sponsor half of a Harvest Box. Each plant will contribute directly to supplementing our artisans’ lunches and provide a training opportunity for our employees. AND you'll receive a free "BE GOOD TO PEOPLE" banner.

Sponsor a Harvest Box- $150

 For just $150, you can get your name, family’s name, organization, or business name on a hand stamped metal placard on the side of the box which you sponsored. You'll also receive a personal thank you video from our staff members. 

We are beyond excited about this new opportunity for our cooperative and, especially, those that will be our first round of gardeners. Haiti Design Co-op is committed to not only providing stability to individuals through employment, but also to life enrichment and community development made possible by your donations. Thank you for your support of this exciting new venture made possible by Harvest 107.

Alongside you, we are planting seeds of change and opportunity.

With love from Ayiti,

-the HDC team

 

 

Salut Friends!

My role here at Haiti Design Co-op has been evolving since I stepped on board as a volunteer one year ago. My love for this place goes deep, and my heart for Haiti goes deeper. My life in Haiti began in June 2014 through working with an orphanage as house mom and running a baby feeding program. Life progressed here in Haiti and I decided to transition into focusing on keeping families together and sustained through job creation, which landed me at Haiti Design Co-op. Here at HDC, I am head of order fulfillment, shipping, and program coordinator. I work alongside our Community Development committee to put in place programs to create opportunities for our workers in education, business development, and life skills.    I am excited to share with you stories from our little family and bustling workshop in Port au Prince, Haiti, as well bits and pieces from the rich culture that makes up this country.

 

My name is Katelyn Hollis, I’ll be the chief contributing writer to the Haiti Design Co-op journal.

 

My role here at Haiti Design Co-op has been evolving since I stepped on board as a volunteer one year ago. My love for this place goes deep, and my heart for Haiti goes deeper. My life in Haiti began in June 2014 through working with an orphanage as house mom and running a baby feeding program. Life progressed here in Haiti and I decided to transition into focusing on keeping families together and sustained through job creation, which landed me at Haiti Design Co-op. Here at HDC, I am head of order fulfillment, shipping, and program coordinator. I work alongside our Community Development committee to put in place programs to create opportunities for our workers in education, business development, and life skills.

I am excited to share with you stories from our little family and bustling workshop in Port au Prince, Haiti, as well bits and pieces from the rich culture that make up this country.


A little speed round q&A from yours truly-

                       

                 

1. What's your favorite part of your daily routine at HDC? 

Making the first round of morning greetings to our teams throughout the workshop rooms. You never know what tidbits of information will unfold since the previous workday. It could quite possibly set the tone for the entire day here on the grounds.  

"Ready or not, here we go!"

 

 

 

 

2. What's your favorite HDC product from the collection?

Classic leather tote in tan. It's timeless. It's leather. Enough said.

3. If advising a person traveling to Haiti for the first time, what are the things they must see and places they must go?

Jacmel. A town on the southern coast, perfectly preserved from an era of bold colors, bustling cobblestone, Caribbean salsa dance, and hand squeezed rhum sours. Oh, and breathtaking beaches.

4. Favorite street food?

Avocados and coconuts! If I’m feeling adventurous, banan pese topped with pikliz (fried plantains with a Haitian style cole slaw / spicy kimchi, the more burn the better!)

 

5. Favorite hobby since moving to Haiti?

Yoga, on our workshop jungalow patio. I love the classic practice in a hot yoga setting, sweating and stretching while surrounded by plants. Serenity.

6. Favorite creole word or phrase and why?

“Toutouni” - naked. Packed with so many uses. To be raw, bare, minimum…. One’s natural state. Pronounced just how it looks, try it you won’t be able to say it just once.   

 

7. What is the weirdest thing for you about going back to America when you visit home?

Watching how fast people move in public places. It gets weird, like they actually have to get things done in a timely fashion. Who woulda thought?! A huge contrast to the streets in Port au Prince.

 

8. What is the hardest part of coming back to Haiti after visiting America?

Usually I'm coming from colder northern parts of the US, so definitely adjusting back to the hot weather. But then it soaks into my core and makes me smile from the inside out, and sweat.


Haiti is a place that appeals to every sense at one time, in each moment. This only takes a split second to see. Let’s step out and explore paths, visions, art forms, and everyday products that make up this heartbreaking and breathtaking little island.

 

With love from Ayiti,

Katelyn Hollis

                            Jacmel, Haiti

                            Jacmel, Haiti